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WebRTC & IP Address Leak Test Tool

Find out if WebRTC is leaking your IP address or if your VPN is working properly by using our leak test tool.

Please choose one option:

This tool detects WebRTC leaks in Chrome, Firefox, Brave, Opera, and other web browsers. Click "Check for WebRTC Leaks" to discover if WebRTC is leaking your information.

This tool detects WebRTC leaks in mobile web browsers

Turn Off VPN and Click “Start Test”

Turn On your VPN and Click “Complete Test”

Fetching results...

Your VPN does not meet the requirements. Use a different VPN and reload the page CTR+F5.

WebRTC Test Leak Result

A public IP address is assigned by your ISP and is used to communicate with devices outside of your network. Public IP addresses are always detectable via TCP/IP.

Public IP Address (Detected via TCP IP)

VPN OFF:

Not Detected

VPN ON:

Not Detected

Your router assigns local IP addresses to the devices connected to your network, which allow devices in your local network to communicate.

Local IP Address (Detected via WebRTC)

VPN OFF:

Not Detected

VPN ON:

Not Detected

A public IP address is assigned by your ISP and is used to communicate with devices outside of your network. Your browser can display your public IP address if WebRTC settings are enabled.

Public IP Address (Detected via WebRTC)

VPN OFF:

Not Detected

VPN ON:

Not Detected

An IPv6 address is a newer form of public IP address. It’s assigned by your ISP and is required to communicate with devices outside of your local network.

IPv6 Address (Detected via WebRTC)

VPN OFF:

Not Detected

VPN ON:

Not Detected

Camera: Not Detected
If your device has a camera, it can be detected if WebRTC is enabled.
Microphone: Not Detected
If your device has a microphone, it can be detected if WebRTC is enabled.

What do your results mean?

Public IP Address (Detected via TCP IP)

This is your public IP address detected via TCP/IP. Public IP addresses are always detectable via TCP/IP, whether it’s a real or VPN IP address. Learn more about TCP/IP.

Local IP Address (Detected via WebRTC)

Our tool has not detected your local IP address. WebRTC is not showing your local IP address to sites that request it. Learn more about local IP addresses.

Public IP Address (Detected via WebRTC)

Our tool has not detected your public IP address. WebRTC is not showing your public IP address to sites that request it. Learn more about public IP addresses.

IPv6 Address (Detected via WebRTC)

Our tool has not detected your IPv6 address. WebRTC is not showing your IPv6 address to sites that request it. Learn more about IPv6 addresses.

Tip: Press CRTL+D to bookmark this page so you can quickly check your connection for leaks before browsing online.

How We Test for WebRTC & IP Address Leaks

Our WebRTC and IP leak test tool detects the IP address information that’s automatically sent to our page via TCP/IP and also by your browser via WebRTC.

Your data: Our WebRTC & IP address leak test tool does not store or share any information required to conduct each test.

Once our tool has gathered all of the necessary information, it will quickly assess the data and signal any potential WebRTC or VPN leaks, including the following:

  • Local IP address leaks (detected via WebRTC)
  • Public IP address leaks (detected via TCP/IP)
  • Public IP address leaks (detected via WebRTC)
  • IPv6 address leaks (detected via WebRTC)

Our tool also scans for device cameras and microphones that can be detected via WebRTC.

If our tool doesn’t detect any leaks, this means that either your VPN is working properly or WebRTC is disabled and isn’t transmitting any information.

Note: Our tool may flag your VPN’s IP address as a potential leak, but this also indicates that your privacy is protected and that WebRTC is not leaking your real IP address.

What is WebRTC?

Web Real Time Communication (WebRTC) is a technology that provides direct online audio and video communication between web browsers and devices, without requiring an intermediate server.

Since WebRTC doesn’t require the use of an intermediate server, it allows devices to communicate and share data back and forth at high speeds, making for a smoother online experience.

Common uses for WebRTC include video calls, P2P file sharing, or hosting live streams on social media platforms.

WebRTC is built into almost all web browsers and it doesn’t require the installation of external plugins. But for WebRTC to work correctly, it needs to share device data between users’ web browsers, including public IP addresses.

The key issue with WebRTC is that it can compromise a user’s privacy by exposing their device data, including their real public IP address, which could enable third parties to identify the user.

WebRTC uses a technology called ICE (Interactive Connectivity Establishment) to detect your device’s IP address. If WebRTC (using ICE) can detect your real IP address through your device even though you’re connected to a VPN, your privacy is compromised.

This is a serious problem for privacy-concerned users, as it will put users at risk of being identified and traced.

What is a WebRTC Leak?

If you’re connected to a VPN but a website can still detect your real IP address via WebRTC, it’s known as a WebRTC leak.

WebRTC leaks can occur in almost all major web browsers, including Chrome, Firefox, and others. This type of leak is often overlooked, but it’s a major threat to your privacy as your real location will be exposed.

Websites and platforms (like video chat services) that use WebRTC make requests to view your public IP address via WebRTC. If you haven’t got the correct privacy protections in place (such as a reliable VPN), websites will be able to view your real IP address and potentially track you.

You can prevent WebRTC leaks by manually disabling WebRTC in your browser, or by using a tried and tested VPN that can successfully replace your real IP address with a virtual IP address.

Disabling WebRTC manually may cause issues with some sites, so you may need to reactivate WebRTC when it’s required and deactivated when you no longer need it. However, it’s much easier to safeguard your privacy by using a VPN that fully protects you from WebRTC leaks.

Unfortunately, not all VPNs are equipped to prevent WebRTC leaks. That’s why the best way to prevent this is to use a VPN with full leak protection, such as ExpressVPN or CyberGhost.

What Is TCP/IP?

TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) is a collection of protocols that enables devices to communicate and share data across the Internet — essentially, TCP/IP is what makes the Internet possible.

TCP/IP involves many technical layers which are responsible for gathering data on one device (known as encapsulation), transmitting the data from one device to another across the Internet, and ensuring the receiving device can read the transmitted data (known as decapsulation).

The process of sending data using TCP/IP looks something like this:

To function, all websites need to detect public IP addresses via TCP/IP, which is why our WebRTC and IP address leak test tool checks for any public IP address leaks — if your test results show the same IP address even with your VPN connected, it means your real IP address is exposed and that your VPN is not working properly.

Local vs. Public IP Addresses Explained

Your local IP address cannot be used to locate you as it is not unique. However, your public IP address is unique and can be used to identify you.

Here are the major differences between the local and public IP addresses:

Local IP addresses are assigned by your router to each of the devices connected to your network, helping your router communicate with each device and allowing each device on the same network to connect (think connecting your smartphone to your wireless printer).

As local IP addresses are reused several times, this type of leak is not much of a privacy concern. Routers often reassign the same local IP addresses to millions of users all over the world, so even if your local IP address is leaking it’s very difficult to track back to you.

Public IP addresses are assigned by your ISP (Internet Service Provider) and are used by other devices outside of your network to recognize you. Essentially, public IP addresses are like a virtual identity that’s attached to you during all of your online activities, enabling you to send and receive information via the internet. Since public IP addresses are unique to you, a leak can expose your location or other personal data.

VS.

What is an IPv4 & IPv6 Address?

An IPv4 (Internet Protocol version 4) address is a unique 32-bit address that identifies a device within a network. The 32-bit address is made up of 4 numbers, between 0 and 255, each separated by a period (for example: 112.234.56.78).

During the internet’s earlier years, to access a website, you had to enter its IPv4 address. However, we now use Domain Name Service (DNS) to translate the website’s IPv4 into words as this is much easier to remember. For example, “172.66.43.25” translates to “vpnmentor.com”.

As the newest protocol, IPv6 was introduced to expand upon the shortage of IP addresses possible with IPv4. IPv6 uses 128-bit addresses comprising 8 sets of alphanumeric digits (numbers and letters) separated by colons. With this system, the amount of possible digit combinations is far-reaching — so each device can have its own IPv6 address.

In addition, IPv6 offers more security and functionality. It’s designed for end-to-end encryption and also supports more advanced security protocols. As of now, the speeds are comparable between IPv6 and IPv4, but with continued optimizations, IPv6 is expected to be faster.

On top of this, IPv6 is more efficient — for instance, it allows multicast addressing which saves your bandwidth by sending media to multiple destinations at once. For these reasons, it’s actively replacing IPv4.

However, as IPv6 hasn’t completely replaced IPv4 (it may still take a number of years to do so) and some VPNs aren’t fully compatible with IPv6 addresses, your real IPv6 address may leak if your VPN doesn’t support IPv6 or doesn’t actively prevent IPv6 leaks.

What Is an IPv4 and IPv6 Leak?

An IPv4 leak occurs when your real IPv4 address is exposed despite being connected to a VPN — either your VPN hasn’t properly replaced your real IPv4 address with a virtual IPv4 address or WebRTC is leaking your real IPv4 address.

An IPv6 leak is similar, but an IPv6 leak can be the result of your VPN provider not supporting IPv6, not recognizing IPv6 addresses, or not providing effective IPv6 leak protections.

When you connect to your VPN, it should mask your public IP address while routing your traffic through one of its private servers. However, if it fails to do so, your real IPv4 or IPv6 address will be exposed.

IPv6 leaks are more common than IPv4 leaks. Many VPNs don’t support IPv6, meaning websites can still detect your real IPv6 address even though your VPN has successfully changed your IPv4 address. That’s why you need to ensure you use a VPN with IPv6 leak protection if your ISP supports IPv6.

VPNs like ExpressVPN and Private Internet Access offer built-in IPv6 leak protection, therefore reducing the risk of IPv6 leaks.

How to Fix and Prevent WebRTC & IP Leaks on All Devices

To prevent WebRTC and IP leaks, you can disable WebRTC in your browser or install a VPN with leak protection. However, WebRTC needs to be enabled in your browser for activities that require the use of your camera and microphone, such as video chat.

You can always enable WebRTC temporarily for certain activities and then disable it afterward to prevent future leaks.

However, using a VPN with leak protection is the simplest way to prevent your real IP address from being exposed. This allows you to use your browser as usual, and without having to disable WebRTC manually. Since the VPN reroutes your traffic through one of its private IPs, your online activity won’t be traced back to your real public IP address.

How to Fix and Prevent WebRTC & IP Leaks on Your PC or Mac

Disable WebRTC In Your Browser

Each browser has a different process for disabling WebRTC. Depending on which you use, follow the appropriate steps below to disable WebRTC and prevent it from leaking your IP address.

How to Disable WebRTC in Chrome:
  1. Navigate to the Google Chrome web store. Type this URL into the Chrome address bar: https://chrome.google.com/webstore
  2. Get WebRTC Control. In the search field on that page, type WebRTC Control. The browser extension should be the first result — click Add to Chrome then Add extension. You’ll need this to enable and disable WebRTC.
  3. Click to disable. Right-click on the extension icon in the upper-right corner of the browser in order to change its options. There should no longer be a blue circle around the extension icon when it is disabled.
How to Disable WebRTC in Microsoft Edge:
  1. Navigate to developer settings. Type "about:flags" into Edge's address bar to locate a list of developer settings.
  2. Click the appropriate checkbox. At the bottom of that list is a checkbox that says Hide my local IP address over WebRTC connections. By default, that box should be unchecked. Click to check it, which will disable WebRTC.
  3. Restart your browser. The change will take effect after doing this.
How to Disable WebRTC in Firefox:
  1. Type "about:config" into the address bar. Then click the button on the warning page that says I accept the risk!. If you just make the specified change, your browser's performance won't be affected in any way. This should direct you to a spreadsheet-style page.
  2. Check if WebRTC is enabled. Type "media.peerconnection.enabled" in the search field. That term should now be the only thing that appears on the site. On the right side of that row, under Value, it will say "true" if WebRTC is enabled.
  3. Disable WebRTC. To disable it, simply double-click anywhere on the row and change the value to false.
How to Disable WebRTC in Brave:
  1. Go to Settings. In Settings, click Advanced and then Privacy and Security.
  2. Find the WebRTC setting. This will be labeled as WebRTC IP handling policy and have a corresponding drop-down menu for you to select from.
  3. Choose Disable non-proxied UDP. This will prevent WebRTC from functioning.
How to Disable WebRTC in Opera:
  1. Go to settings. Type about:config and press enter. Then click Settings and Show advanced settings.
  2. Click Privacy & security. Then, find where it says “WebRTC”.
  3. Select Disable non-proxied UDP. This disables WebRTC. Then ensure to save your changes.
How to Disable WebRTC in Safari:
  1. Go to the advanced preferences. Click Safari on the menu bar, then click Preferences and then the tab that says Advanced (this should be in the new window that opens).
  2. Check “Show Develop menu in menu bar”. Once checked, click the Develop option when it is visible on the menu bar.
  3. Disable WebRTC. Click WebRTC from the dropdown menu and then uncheck Enable Legacy WebRTC API.

Install a VPN with Built-In Leak Protection

When you use a reliable VPN with your PC or Mac, your real IP address is replaced by a virtual IP address. As a result, your real IP address and location are hidden during your online activities (like browsing, streaming, and torrenting).

Furthermore, the VPN’s leak protection feature provides additional assurance that your real IP address won’t be exposed.

Here is how to set up a VPN on PC or Mac
  1. Sign up for a VPN. My top choice is ExpressVPN for its robust privacy features. You even can test it out with your PC or Mac risk-free since it offers a 30-day money-back guarantee.
  2. Install the VPN. Visit the VPN’s downloads page where you will find downloads for PC and Mac. Click the appropriate app for your device and follow the prompts for installing it. The entire process took me less than 3 minutes with ExpressVPN.
  3. Connect and prevent leaks. Simply connect the VPN to a server of your choice and enjoy your online activities without worry of WebRTC or IP leaks.

Schedule Regular IP Leak Tests

Setting up regular IP leak tests will tell you how well your privacy is being protected by your VPN. You can revisit this tool every time you connect to your VPN to ensure your connection is secure — it only takes a few seconds to run a test, and the assurance it gives you is well worth it.

But I also recommend setting a reminder to run a leak test weekly to know if your VPN is fully protecting you.

How to Fix and Prevent WebRTC & IP Leaks on Your iPhone or iPad

While you can’t manually disable WebRTC in the most up-to-date versions of iOS, you can still protect your real IP address by following the steps below.

Install a VPN with Built-In Leak Protection

Using a VPN for iOS protects you from leaks by rerouting your data through its private IPs. Meanwhile, your actual IP address and location are safeguarded by the VPN’s leak protection feature. This ensures that you won’t be exposed to websites, prying eyes, or cybercriminals.

My first recommendation for leak protection is ExpressVPN. It offers a user-friendly iOS app with a lightweight proprietary protocol (Lightway) which is ideal for mobile and tablets.

CyberGhost is another safe option for iOS — each leak test I’ve run it through has proven that it effectively masks your IP. Its iOS app is easy to install and use. Plus, it offers its own NoSpy servers, which are located in the privacy-friendly country Romania. They are only accessible by CyberGhost employees to prevent third-party intervention.

Here is how to set up a VPN on iOS:
  1. Sign up. Visit CyberGhost’s website, choose a plan, and set up your account. You can try it out with iOS for 45-days using its money-back guarantee (when you sign up for its long-term plan).
  2. Install the VPN. Locate the iOS app on the VPN’s downloads page to begin installation.
  3. Connect and prevent leaks. Open the VPN app and select a server to connect. Now you can browse, stream, torrent, and more with confidence that your IP won’t be leaked.

Schedule Regular IP Leak Tests

Setting up regular IP leak tests will tell you how well your privacy is being protected by your VPN. You can bookmark this page in your browser app and run a test daily to ensure your VPN connection is secure.

Even weekly leak tests will give you a decent idea of how well your VPN is protecting you.

How to Fix and Prevent WebRTC & IP Leaks on Your Android Device

It’s not currently possible to manually disable WebRTC on an Android device, but you can still take measures to prevent your real IP address from leaking.

Install a VPN with Built-In Leak Protection

You can protect your Android from leaks by routing your traffic through a VPN that offers leak protection. This ensures your real IP address and location will be hidden during your online activities.

A couple of highly secure Android VPNs are ExpressVPN and Private Internet Access (PIA). ExpressVPN has a mobile-friendly and superfast Lightway Protocol that you can use on Android. On the other hand, PIA provides an intuitive Android app that lets you customize your security and privacy features. Plus, it has a massive server network — so you’ll always have access to fast and secure connections.

Here is how to set up PIA on Android:
  1. Create an account. Head to PIA’s homepage, select a plan, and follow the prompts to sign up. PIA gives you 30 days to test it with your Android with its money-back guarantee.
  2. Download the app. Choose the Android app from PIA’s downloads page and follow the installation instructions. This should only take a few minutes.
  3. Connect and prevent leaks. Choose a server and turn the VPN on to prevent WebRTC and IP leaks during your online activities.

Schedule Regular IP Leak Tests

Setting up regular IP leak tests will tell you how well your privacy is being protected by your VPN. Bookmark this page in your Android browser app and schedule a daily leak test to ensure your VPN connection is secure.

Weekly leak tests will also give you a decent idea of how effective your VPN is at securing your privacy.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I know if my IP address is being leaked?

The quickest way to find out if your public IP address is leaking is to perform an IP leak test.

vpnMentor’s leak test tool looks for both WebRTC and VPN leaks, and it will alert you if it finds any local, public, or IPv6 address leaks.

What is WebRTC and is it secure?

WebRTC is a function built into most web browsers that allows your device to communicate with other devices without the need of an intermediary server.

It’s a completely legitimate feature that has many uses, including video calls and live streaming on social media platforms. For WebRTC to work, it requires access to detailed information — including your real IP address and device type.

While WebRTC isn’t malicious, the amount of data WebRTC has access to can pose a privacy risk, especially if you’re using a VPN. A vulnerability in the software can cause WebRTC to leak your real IP address even if you’re connected to a VPN, which is why it’s important for privacy-concerned users to test for WebRTC leaks before browsing online.

Should I turn off WebRTC in my browser?

It depends on how you use your device. WebRTC can be a useful tool, allowing you to communicate with other peers via voice and video calls, post live content on social media, and more.

However, if you don’t use your device for these types of communication, disabling WebRTC can help prevent unnecessary IP leaks. Plus, you can always enable it anytime you need — just remember to disable it after use to ensure your protection.

How do I prevent WebRTC and IP address leaks?

The easiest method to prevent WebRTC and IP address leaks is to use a VPN with reliable leak protection.

Since a VPN safeguards your personal data and location, you can continue using your browser with WebRTC enabled without limitations. Just make sure you run your VPN through a leak test to ensure that it truly is masking your IP address and preventing any WebRTC leaks.

You can also disable WebRTC manually either by installing a third-party WebRTC disabling extension or by manually disabling WebRTC in your browser settings. But disabling WebRTC may cause some websites and online services to not work properly.

Scheduling leak tests are helpful to see if your real IP address is exposed. You can run a leak test to ensure that your connection is secure before browsing online.

How do I stop WebRTC and IP leaks in Chrome?

You’ll need to add a Chrome WebRTC disabling extension, such as WebRTC Control. Using the extension, you will be able to enable and disable WebRTC in your browser.

However, you can also stop WebRTC leaks in Chrome by using a reputable VPN, which changes your real IP address to a virtual IP address, thus stopping your original IP and real location from being leaked.

Can WebRTC leaks happen on Android and iOS devices?

Unfortunately, yes — WebRTC leaks can happen on Android, iOS, and any other mobile device. Both Android and iOS have browsers that use WebRTC (Chrome and Safari).

You cannot disable WebRTC on Android or iOS devices, like you can with PCs and Macs. But you can protect your real IP address by installing a VPN app — a VPN will replace your real public IP address with a virtual IP address, so websites cannot view or track your real IP address.