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vpnMentor was established in 2014 as an independent site reviewing VPN services and covering privacy-related stories. Today, our team of hundreds of cybersecurity researchers, writers, and editors continues to help readers fight for their online freedom in partnership with Kape Technologies PLC, which also owns the following products: ExpressVPN, CyberGhost, and Private Internet Access which may be ranked and reviewed on this website. The reviews published on vpnMentor are believed to be accurate as of the date of each article, and written according to our strict reviewing standards that prioritize the independent, professional and honest examination of the reviewer, taking into account the technical capabilities and qualities of the product together with its commercial value for users. The rankings and reviews we publish may also take into consideration the common ownership mentioned above, and affiliate commissions we earn for purchases through links on our website. We do not review all VPN providers and information is believed to be accurate as of the date of each article.
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vpnMentor was established in 2014 as an independent site reviewing VPN services and covering privacy-related stories. Today, our team of hundreds of cybersecurity researchers, writers, and editors continues to help readers fight for their online freedom in partnership with Kape Technologies PLC, which also owns the following products: ExpressVPN, CyberGhost, and Private Internet Access which may be ranked and reviewed on this website. The reviews published on vpnMentor are believed to be accurate as of the date of each article, and written according to our strict reviewing standards that prioritize the independent, professional and honest examination of the reviewer, taking into account the technical capabilities and qualities of the product together with its commercial value for users. The rankings and reviews we publish may also take into consideration the common ownership mentioned above, and affiliate commissions we earn for purchases through links on our website. We do not review all VPN providers and information is believed to be accurate as of the date of each article.

5 Best VPNs for Linux in 2024 — Secure and Easy to Set Up

Lawrence Wachira Updated on 7th December 2023 Fact-checked by Anneke van Aswegen Senior Writer

Many VPNs claim to fully support Linux but fall short by offering stripped-down services, resulting in a less-than-ideal online experience that doesn't match what Mac and Windows users get. Also, many VPNs don't have native Linux apps, leaving it tricky to manually configure.

My team and I tested 50+ VPNs and shortlisted the best ones for Linux. These have intuitive Linux apps that you can install in just a few clicks. They also protect your online privacy with robust security features. Plus, they have fast servers worldwide, so you can quickly access your accounts (like Netflix US) from anywhere.

Out of all the VPNs I tested, ExpressVPN is my favorite because of its impressive speeds, simple CLI, and military-grade protection. It also offers a 30-day money-back guarantee, so you can try ExpressVPN risk-free. If you're not satisfied, getting a full refund is easy.

Try ExpressVPN for Linux >>

Short on Time? Here Are the Best VPNs for Linux in 2024

  • Editor's Choice
    ExpressVPN
    ExpressVPN
    Top VPN for Linux with fast global servers and user-friendly native app.
    70% of our readers choose ExpressVPN
  • CyberGhost VPN
    CyberGhost
    Large network with streaming-optimized servers, plus user-friendly CLI app.
  • Private Internet Access
    Private Internet Access
    Multiple connections and a Linux GUI for comprehensive device protection.
  • NordVPN
    NordVPN
    Advanced security features for enhanced privacy on Linux systems.
  • Surfshark
    Surfshark
    Easy-to-use GUI app for seamless VPN experience on Linux.

Best VPNs for Linux — Full Analysis (Updated 2024)

1. ExpressVPN — Impressive Speed to Stream in 4K and Torrent Without Slowdowns on Linux

Best Feature Low ping to play games on Linux without lag
Security & Privacy Threat Manager keeps you safe from sites that are known to host malware
Server Network 3,000 servers in 105 countries
Works With Netflix, Hulu, BBC iPlayer, Max, Amazon Prime Video, Peacock, ESPN+, and more

Of all the VPNs I tested, ExpressVPN provided the fastest speeds for uninterrupted streaming, torrenting, and gaming on Linux. Connecting to a Dallas server, I clocked an average download rate of 99.5Mbps — only an 11.8% drop from my original speed of 112.8Mbps. Even on servers farther away, like in India, I still got excellent results. You only need 25Mbps for 4K streaming, so this was more than enough for UHD viewing.

A screenshot showing ExpressVPN delivers fast speed on LinuxYou can expect a 20%+ drop in speed with most VPNs, but not with ExpressVPN

Its robust security features are all available on the CLI app, so your online activity remains private. The virtually uncrackable encryption (AES 256-bit) makes it impossible for anyone to snoop on your data. There’s also a kill switch that prevents accidental data exposure by cutting your internet connection should the VPN accidentally drop (but this never happened to me). ExpressVPN passed all my leak tests, so your real IP address and DNS requests stay hidden.

On top of that, it uses RAM-only servers (TrustedServer technology) to help you maintain your privacy on Linux. These servers wipe your data after every server reboot, so there isn’t data left to be logged. However, no data is collected in the first place as ExpressVPN follows an audited no-logs policy. It further enforces this by having its headquarters in a privacy-friendly jurisdiction, the British Virgin Islands. Together, these features keep you anonymous online.

On the downside, subscriptions are a bit pricey, starting at $6.67/month. However, ExpressVPN offers generous discounts throughout the year and a 30-day money-back guarantee. I got 49% off my 12-month plan. It’s easy to cancel and get your money back if it doesn’t meet your needs. I asked for a refund using the 24/7 live chat, and the support agent processed my request immediately. My bank account was reimbursed 3 days later.

Useful Features

  • Compatible with Linux distros. ExpressVPN Linux app can run on Linux distros like Ubuntu, Debian, and Fedora. Plus, the VPN provides installation instructions and commands for each.
  • Browser-based GUI. If you're more of a visual person, you can access and control ExpressVPN with a GUI when you use its Chrome, Edge, and Firefox extensions.
  • Lightway and OpenVPN protocol. These industry-leading protocols keep your connection secure. Lightway is designed by ExpressVPN to deliver impressive speeds (it gave me the fastest speeds during my tests),. Still, OpenVPN is the gold standard in security.
  • Obfuscation. If ExpressVPN detects VPN blocking technology, like DPI, it automatically conceals your VPN traffic as regular HTTP(s) traffic. This allows the use of the VPN even in countries with strict censorship, like China.
  • Device connection allowance. Each plan lets you simultaneously stream, torrent, or game on 8 devices.
ExpressVPN Offer February 2024: For a limited time only, you can get an ExpressVPN subscription for up to 49% off! Don't miss out!

2. CyberGhost — Global Network to Access Your Favorite Content on Linux From Anywhere

Best Feature Reliably unblock your favorite TV shows and movies with servers dedicated to streaming
Security & Privacy RAM-based servers delete your data with every reboot
Server network 11,683 servers in 100 countries
Works With Netflix, Hulu, BBC iPlayer, Max, Amazon Prime Video, Peacock, ESPN+, and more

Geo-restrictions are no problem for CyberGhost's huge network of 11,683 servers worldwide, including ones optimized for streaming and torrenting. Many servers also mean less chance of slowdowns due to overcrowding. I had no problem accessing DAZN Canada, Netflix US, and BBC iPlayer during my tests with CyberGhost's optimized server.

A screenshot showing CyberGhost's Linux command that helps you connect to one of the available countriesTo view a list of all available servers, type “cyberghostvpn --traffic --country-code”

I speed-tested the VPN using OpenVPN and WireGuard. Both protocols performed well, but WireGuard gave me the best speeds — I averaged 95.5Mbps while testing servers across France, Japan, and Canada. This was only a 14.2% reduction against a base of 111.3Mbps. You can enjoy smooth gameplay, stream in UHD, and download files quickly with CyberGhost.

The VPN also takes your security seriously. Its built-in ad, tracker, and malware blocker keep you safe from online threats, while AES 256-bit encryption secures your Linux device against hackers. In addition, its DNS/IP leak protection and kill switch prevent exposure of your data.

One drawback is that its short-term subscriptions come with a reduced refund policy. However, you can try CyberGhost for free using its 45-day money-back guarantee on long-term plans. I asked for a refund via its live chat feature to test this claim. The support rep was very helpful and only asked if I had suggestions on how they might improve their app in the future. I got my money paid to my PayPal after 4 days.

Useful Features

  • 7 simultaneous connections. You can use the VPN in multiple Linux distros like Ubuntu and CentOS at the same time without having to log out of your account.
  • Linux-specific guides. The VPN offers a detailed guide for installing its CLI app and an extensive list of available commands.
  • Privacy-friendly jurisdiction. Like ExpressVPN, CyberGhost is based outside the data-sharing pact of the 5/9/14 Eyes Alliances (in Romania). This is also where it hosts its special NoSpy servers, which only the CyberGhost team can access, making them extra secure.
  • 24/7 customer support. Its knowledgeable support team is available round the clock via live chat to answer any questions.
February 2024 Deal: CyberGhost is currently offering 84% off its most popular plan! Take advantage of this offer now and save more on your CyberGhost subscription.

3. Private Internet Access (PIA) — Secure All Your Devices With Multiple Simultaneous Connections

Best Feature Use the GUI app on all your Linux distros at no additional cost
Security & Privacy AES 256-bit encryption and obfuscation protect you from third-party surveillance
Server Network 29,650 servers 91 countries
Works With Netflix, Hulu, BBC iPlayer, Max, Amazon Prime Video, Peacock, ESPN+, and more

PIA offers unlimited connections to cover all your devices using a single subscription. This is great for a family or business looking to protect all devices concurrently. I connected 2 laptops and 4 smartphones all at the same time. They all worked fine, and my speeds remained stable while connected to the same server. I maintained an average download speed of 95.4Mbps — only 15% less than the 112.2Mbps without a VPN connection.

A screenshot showing PIA is ideal for UHD streaming on LinuxThere were no quality issues even when I hopped to different sections

It also offers a GUI for Linux. So you can connect to a server and tweak settings without using the command line. This feature makes the VPN a great choice if you’re a Linux user new to VPNs. While testing PIA, I browsed its server list without entering any command.

One issue is that the VPN is based in the US, a member of the 5 Eyes Alliance. However, this isn’t a problem as PIA uses RAM-only servers and a verified no-logs policy — so your online activity is never recorded. Plus, it provides 2 kill switches, DNS/IP/WebRTC leak protection, and advanced security protocols like OpenVPN and WireGuard.

Like ExpressVPN, all plans come with a 30-day money-back guarantee, so you can try PIA before committing long-term. When I requested a refund using 24/7 live chat, the money appeared in my bank account within the week.

Useful Features

  • Ads and malware blocker (MACE). Enhances your experience on Linux by blocking ads, trackers, and malware. It compares the websites you visit against a database of known trouble spots.
  • Port forwarding and SOCKS5 proxy. These options enhance your torrenting experience by giving you a speed boost. However, you’ll not be protected by encryption.
  • Split tunneling. You can choose which websites or apps use the PIA’s encrypted VPN tunnel and which bypass it.
  • Open source client. The VPN offers you the flexibility of inspecting its security practices with an open-source app for Linux distros like Mint, Arch, and Debian.
February 2024 Update: PIA doesn't usually have deals or discounts (it's already so affordable), but right now you can get a new subscription for a crazy 82% off!

4. NordVPN — Speciality Servers to Secure Your Data on Linux

Best Feature Top-notch encryption and Perfect Forward Secrecy secure your connections against monitoring
Security & Privacy Obfuscated servers hide your VPN traffic for enhanced anonymity online
Server Network 6,088 servers in 61 countries
Works With Netflix, Hulu, BBC iPlayer, Max, Amazon Prime Video, Peacock, ESPN+, and more

NordVPN offers several specialty servers to protect your connection against online threats. For example, Double VPN adds an extra layer of protection by encrypting your traffic twice. On the other hand, Tor over VPN routes your traffic through the VPN and then the Tor network for additional security. Then, there are also the basic security features, including an automatic kill switch and DNS/IP/WebRTC leak protection. Plus, Threat Protection Lite blocks ads, malware, and tracker blockers.

A screenshot showing NordVPN's CLI Linux app comes with Nordlynx protocol.OpenVPN is also integrated into its Linux VPN client, so you can choose your preferred protocol

Streaming is also smooth, thanks to its Nordlynx protocol. The server in Japan, Canada, and Germany gave impressive results while speed-testing NordVPN. I averaged 92.3Mbps — only a 16.3% drop from my baseline connection of 110.3Mbps. I could stream ZDF, Netflix Canada, and NHK in 4K at such speeds.

My only concern is that its privacy policy indicates a willingness to cooperate with government data requests. However, NordVPN follows a zero-logs policy verified by PricewaterhouseCoopers, so I'm not worried.

If you're unhappy with the VPN, requesting a fund via 24/7 live chat is easy. Just make sure it's within the 30-day refund period.

Useful Features

  • Split tunneling. This feature gives you more control over your online privacy when using Linux, allowing you to choose which traffic passes through the VPN tunnel.
  • Open source Linux app. Similar to PIA's Linux client, NordVPN also provides an open-source Linux app, giving you the flexibility to examine the underlying code.
  • Detailed guides. NordVPN's website features in-depth tutorials, including instructions on how to set up the service on different Linux distros and using the Network Manager.
  • Auto Connect. Once enabled, it instantly secures your connection whenever you join any mobile, WiFi, or Ethernet network. This enhances your privacy on unsecured networks when using Linux.

5. Surfshark — GUI App for Linux Makes It Straightforward To Use

Best Feature Comes pre-configured, so you don’t have to tweak any settings
Security & Privacy CleanWeb keeps you safe by blocking malicious ads, malware, and trackers
Server Network 3,200 servers in 100 countries
Works With Netflix, Hulu, BBC iPlayer, Max, Amazon Prime Video, Peacock, ESPN+, and more

Surfshark's user-friendly GUI app gives you the convenience of a one-click connection — you don’t need to bother with the command line. This is particularly beneficial for novice and seasoned Linux users seeking a similar experience to its Windows and Mac versions. During my tests, I installed Surfshark on my PPC within 5 minutes and established a secure connection.

A screenshot showing it's easy to find and connect to a server with Surfshark GUI appThe Fastest Location feature finds the fastest server depending on your location and server load

MultiHop (Double VPN) and a choice of tunneling protocols (OpenVPN and WireGuard) secure your data from hackers and snoops. A kill switch and DNS/IP/WebRTC protection further shield your data from being tracked.

A slight drawback is that it's in the Netherlands, a 14 Eyes intelligence-sharing alliance member. Luckily, its strict no-logs policy prevents it from logging and storing any sensitive data.

The best way to see if Surfshark is right for you is to give it a try by taking advantage of its 30-day money-back guarantee. I did that, and my PayPal wallet was refunded after 7 days.

Useful Features

  • Camouflage mode. Enhance your privacy by making your traffic look like regular traffic, allowing you to avoid ISP blocks when engaging in bandwidth-intensive activities like torrenting.
  • Excellent speed. The VPN did well in my speed tests. When connected to the UK, Australia, and Ukraine servers, I recorded a download speed of 91.2Mbps (a 17.3% drop ). With this result, I had no issues watching or downloading movies and TV shows.
  • Unlimited simultaneous connections. With a single account, you can protect all your devices at once.

Quick Comparison Table: Linux VPN Features

The following table compares important features of a Linux VPN client. Here you can see each VPN’s lowest price, the type of app it offers, the number of servers it has, and more.

Lowest Price App Type Supported Distros Speed Drop # of Servers
🥇ExpressVPN $6.67/month CLI Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, Raspberry Pi OS, Linux Mint, Arch, and more 11.8% 3,000 servers in 105 countries
🥈CyberGhost $2.03/month CLI Ubuntu, Fedora, Linux Mint, Kali, CentOS, PoP!_OS, and more 14.2% 11,683 servers in 100 countries
🥉PIA $2.03/month GUI Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, Linux Mint, Arch, and more 15% 29,650 servers in 91 countries
NordVPN $3.39/month CLI Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, Linux Mint, Elementary OS, and more 16.3% 6,088 servers in 61 countries
Surfshark $2.89/month GUI Ubuntu, Debian, and Linux Mint 17.3% 3,200 servers in 100 countries

Why You Need a VPN for Linux

Linux is superior to Windows and Mac at protecting you from viruses and malware. But a VPN can significantly increase your online security and prove helpful in the work environment. Here are some reasons a VPN might be necessary for Linux users:

  • Safe remote work. A VPN is crucial for Linux users who work remotely or travel frequently. It ensures a secure connection to your company's resources, protecting sensitive data from potential interception.
  • Maintain your privacy. Linux is less prone to malware attacks, but it doesn’t hide your internet traffic. A VPN enhances your online privacy by encrypting your traffic, making it impossible for third parties like ISPs and workplaces to monitor your online activity through your IP address.
  • Security over public WiFi. It’s very easy for hackers to spy on your traffic over public networks, but a VPN scrambles your data so it can’t be read.
  • Testing networks. IT professionals using Linux often use VPNs to test network configurations and software from different geographic locations.
  • Avoid geo-blocks. VPNs get around these restrictions by assigning you a new IP address. This hides your real location and gives you access to content from your home country when traveling abroad.
  • Avoid bandwidth throttling. Internet service providers see what you’re doing online and can throttle your speeds if they detect you’re engaging in data-intensive activities like torrenting. A VPN assigns you a different IP address, making it difficult for ISPs to see what you’re doing online.
  • Torrent without fear. A VPN is essential if you're involved in P2P sharing or torrenting. It can keep you safe online and prevent access from unknown third parties.

Tips on Choosing the Best VPN for Linux

The user provides a guide or criteria for ranking top Linux recommendations. If others wish to conduct their own evaluations, they are welcome to use this guide as a reference.

  • Native Linux app. Manual configurations can be time-consuming, requiring additional steps for simple things, like adding a new server. If ease of use is important, go for a VPN with a native GUI or CLI client.
  • High-grade security features. To stay safe online, your VPN should at least have AES 256-bit encryption, a kill switch, DNS/IP/ WebRTC leak protection, and a no-logs policy.
  • Distro support. Ensure you can install the VPN on your preferred distro and use it on multiple devices simultaneously without additional cost.
  • Large server network. Worldwide access ensures you can connect to a VPN and protect your connection, no matter where you are. The best VPNs have extensive server networks, so there’s always a nearby server for fast speeds.
  • Impressive speed. Speeds decrease when you connect to a VPN because your connection is encrypted. If you plan on gaming, downloading files, or streaming in 4K, you'll want a VPN that doesn't noticeably compromise your speed.
  • Reliable customer support. VPNs with 24/7 live chat offer instant assistance. All the VPNs on my list have this feature and provide email support with quick turnaround times.
  • Reliable money-back guarantee. This lets you try the VPN and get a full refund if you’re not satisfied.

Linux VPNs to Avoid

Some VPNs should be avoided due to security concerns, questionable privacy policies, and performance issues. I recommend you steer clear of the below VPNs as they limit server locations and have vulnerabilities that could potentially expose you to online threats:

  • Unlocator. Unlocator supports Ubuntu, but it’s not safe to use. A quick dig into Unlocator’s privacy policy shows that it keeps identifiable logs of your usage, which means your online activity could be traced back to you.
  • SecurityKISS. This VPN claims to be a secure VPN for Linux, but its privacy policy shows otherwise. I found that the VPN logs your timestamps and bandwidth usage, so your anonymity isn’t protected.
  • CactusVPN. I was pleased to see this VPN offers WireGuard support for Linux, but it sadly has a small server network (3,000 servers in 105 countries).
  • USAIP. This VPN offers OpenVPN support for Linux, but its policy indicates a willingness to comply with government requests for user information.

Quick Guide: How to Set Up a VPN on Linux in 3 Easy Steps

  1. Get a Linux VPN. I recommend ExpressVPN because it delivers military-grade encryption without compromising your speed. Plus, it has a native CLI app for Linux that’s easy to use.
  2. Follow the instructions and install. Many VPNs have detailed guides on installing and using a VPN client on Linux.
  3. Connect to a server. Launch your VPN and select your preferred server. You can now anonymously stream, game, or torrent.

Pro Tip. You may need to run the VPN in super user mode if you get permission errors. To do this, type sudo before any commands. Note that certain risks are involved with running commands in sudo mode, so ensure that the VPN distributor recommends this before doing so.

How to Manually Install OpenVPN on Linux

If your chosen VPN doesn’t support Linux, you can manually configure OpenVPN on your device instead. You first need to download the OpenVPN configuration files for each connection, which are supplied by your VPN provider. The easiest way to do this is to ask your provider for the file links through live chat. I did this myself, and they provided the links quickly.

You can also set up WireGuard manually in Linux, just like OpenVPN. WireGuard has been incorporated into the Linux kernel since version 5.6. So any distro like Debian and Fedora running on a kernel of that version or newer should support it. However, it’s up to the maintainers of each distro whether to include it by default or not.

However, certain features like a kill switch and DNS/IP/WebRTC leak protection aren't readily available when manually installing a VPN. While it’s possible to add them later on, the process can be complex. If you prefer to avoid this additional effort, it’d be more convenient to choose a VPN that offers built-in support for these features.

Here's a basic rundown of what you'll need to do. Note that the actual steps might vary depending on the Linux distro you’re using. On Ubuntu, for example, you can do this:

  • Open the terminal. You can find it in the applications menu or press Ctrl+Alt+T keys.
  • Install OpenVPN client by entering the following command sudo apt install openvpn openvpn-systemd-resolved. When prompted, enter your administrator password and press Enter. After entering the password, you will be asked whether you want to continue with the installation. Type y and press Enter to proceed. This will allow the installation to complete by automatically installing any necessary dependencies.
  • The installation process should now be complete.
  • Go to your VPN provider to get your account credentials. I'm using ExpressVPN in this example.
  • Download config files from your VPN provider.
  • Run OpenVPN. Use the following command sudo openvpn --config /[path to file]/my_expressvpn_[server location].ovpn --script-security 2 --up /etc/openvpn/update-systemd-resolved --down /etc/openvpn/update-systemd-resolved --dhcp-option 'DOMAIN-ROUTE.' --down-pre.
  • Replace [path/to/configfile] with the actual path to your OpenVPN configuration file.
  • Replace [server location] with the location displayed in the file name.
  • Enter your credentials. Enter your username and password that you got from your VPN provider.
  • Wait for the connection. If successfully connected to ExpressVPN, you'll see the words Initialization Sequence Completed.
  • To disconnect, simply close the terminal running the command, hit Ctrl+C.

Additional Safety Tips for Linux

While a VPN enhances data protection, there are additional measures you can implement to heighten your security when utilizing Linux.

  • Get an antivirus. Linux is the safest OS, but you should still take every precaution against malicious software. This includes installing and activating antivirus software.
  • Use secure browsers. Many Linux distros come with Firefox, which is good. But you can’t beat Tor when it comes to anonymity.
  • Choose a privacy-friendly distro. Each distro handles safety differently. Tails, Qubes, Blackarch, Kali, and Kodachi is a good bet if you’re looking for extreme privacy.
  • Utilize intrusion detection tools. Two examples of such intrusion detection tools are Tripwire and Verisys. These apps monitor network traffic, system logs, and configurations to detect suspicious activities and generate alerts for security breaches.
  • Use anti-rootkit software. Rootkits use methods like adware, backdoors, screen scrapers, and keyloggers to steal sensitive data. Anti-rootkit tools can detect and remove them from your Linux.

FAQs on the Best VPNs for Linux

Why is my Linux VPN not working?

If your VPN isn’t working, you may have come across a blocklisted server. VPN servers get blocklisted all the time. If this happens to you, try choosing a different server. If that doesn’t work, contact customer support to see if they can resolve the issue. Fortunately, the best VPNs for Linux mitigate this problem by actively updating their server networks.

Can I use a free VPN for Linux?

Technically yes, but it's unsafe as they lack the high-level security features paid VPNs have. Some have been found to inject malware into their installation software, potentially causing severe device issues. Worst, they can log and sell your sensitive information. A better option is a premium VPN with a reliable refund policy and robust security features. Most free VPNs also restrict your usage, server access, speeds, and bandwidth.

Can I make my own VPN on Linux?

Yes, there are various ways to create a custom VPN on Linux. You can manually install the OpenVPN client following the instructions from your VPN provider. However, here is a quick summary on how to configure your VPN on Linux.

You can also use cloud services like Amazon Web Services or Digital Ocean and tools like SoftEther VPN, and StrongSwan.

However, despite offering full control, a DIY VPN has downsides. It’s harder to set up than the pre-made options, offers limited server locations, and using a cloud provider means your data goes through a third party.

Is it safe to use a VPN with Linux?

Yes, using a VPN with Linux is generally safe and often recommended. VPNs provide an added layer of security and privacy, which complements the inherent security advantages of the Linux operating system. Simply launch your VPN and connect to a server to keep your Linux data safe online.

Are Linux VPNs legal?

Yes, it’s legal to use a Linux VPN. VPNs are recognized tools for enhancing online privacy and security. However, some countries do ban the use of VPNs due to censorship. Also, while using a VPN is legal, it does not legalize otherwise illegal activities. For example, downloading copyrighted content.

Will my VPN work with Linux distros?

The compatibility of a VPN with Linux distros varies depending on the provider. However, premium VPNs offer support for popular distros like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Debian, and Kali Linux. They often provide native VPN clients and detailed instructions for manual configuration.

Which Linux distro is best for privacy?

Tails is the most secure distro for concealing your information. It’s run from a USB stick, so it leaves zero traces of your activity on your computer. It also runs all of your traffic through TOR to ensure anonymity. Plus, everything you do is wiped away immediately once you shut down. However, if you want to stream, game, or torrent, you’ll need to use a more common distro like Ubuntu. Without Tails’ extra security features, be sure to use a VPN that protects your privacy and data.

Does Linux have a built-in VPN?

Several distros include a built-in VPN capability through the Network Manager. However, it's important to note that this feature is not equivalent to having a full-fledged VPN. For the best security, it’s better to select a trustworthy VPN that offers a Linux-specific client.

The Network Manager gives you the ability to set up VPN connections without needing a standalone app. Plus, to establish a complete VPN connection, you will still need a VPN service provider and its corresponding configuration details.

Get the Best VPN for Linux

A VPN can protect you online where a Linux operating system can’t. While Linux is usually very secure, a VPN adds an additional layer of privacy to give you online anonymity and safeguard you against hackers, trackers, and snoops.

ExpressVPN offers the best Linux support of all the VPNs I tested. It delivers fast speeds, has an easy-to-use native Linux app, and comes with security features that are hard to beat. You can even try it out risk-free as it's baked by a 30-day money-back guarantee.

To summarize, these are the best VPNs for Linux...

Rank
Provider
Our Score
Discount
Visit Website
1
medal
9.9 /10
9.9 Our Score
Save 49%!
2
9.7 /10
9.7 Our Score
Save 84%!
3
9.5 /10
9.5 Our Score
Save 82%!
4
9.4 /10
9.4 Our Score
Save 67%!
5
9.3 /10
9.3 Our Score
Save 82%!
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The information above can be used to track you, target you for ads, and monitor what you do online.

VPNs can help you hide this information from websites so that you are protected at all times. We recommend ExpressVPN — the #1 VPN out of over 350 providers we've tested. It has military-grade encryption and privacy features that will ensure your digital security, plus — it's currently offering 49% off.

Visit ExpressVPN

We review vendors based on rigorous testing and research but also take into account your feedback and our affiliate commission with providers. Some providers are owned by our parent company.
Learn more
vpnMentor was established in 2014 as an independent site reviewing VPN services and covering privacy-related stories. Today, our team of hundreds of cybersecurity researchers, writers, and editors continues to help readers fight for their online freedom in partnership with Kape Technologies PLC, which also owns the following products: ExpressVPN, CyberGhost, and Private Internet Access which may be ranked and reviewed on this website. The reviews published on vpnMentor are believed to be accurate as of the date of each article, and written according to our strict reviewing standards that prioritize the independent, professional and honest examination of the reviewer, taking into account the technical capabilities and qualities of the product together with its commercial value for users. The rankings and reviews we publish may also take into consideration the common ownership mentioned above, and affiliate commissions we earn for purchases through links on our website. We do not review all VPN providers and information is believed to be accurate as of the date of each article.

About the Author

Lawrence Wachira, a Senior Writer at vpnMentor, is passionate about making the internet safer. Lawrence writes insightful product reviews, comparison pages, and blog posts to help readers protect their online privacy and choose the best VPNs.

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