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vpnMentor was established in 2014 as an independent site reviewing VPN services and covering privacy-related stories. Today, our team of hundreds of cybersecurity researchers, writers, and editors continues to help readers fight for their online freedom in partnership with Kape Technologies PLC, which also owns the following products: ExpressVPN, CyberGhost, and Private Internet Access which may be ranked and reviewed on this website. The reviews published on vpnMentor are believed to be accurate as of the date of each article, and written according to our strict reviewing standards that prioritize the independent, professional and honest examination of the reviewer, taking into account the technical capabilities and qualities of the product together with its commercial value for users. The rankings and reviews we publish may also take into consideration the common ownership mentioned above, and affiliate commissions we earn for purchases through links on our website. We do not review all VPN providers and information is believed to be accurate as of the date of each article.

Apple Restricts Employee Use of ChatGPT

Apple Restricts Employee Use of ChatGPT
Keira Waddell Published on 23rd May 2023 Senior Writer

According to The Wall Street Journal, Apple has recently imposed restrictions on its employees surrounding the use of generative AI tools, such as OpenAI's ChatGPT. The company's concerns revolve around the potential for confidential information to be collected and potentially leaked through these AI systems.

Apple has also cautioned its workforce against using GitHub's AI assistant, Copilot, an AI tool owned by Microsoft. The inclusion of ChatGPT in Apple's list of prohibited software, as reported via a tweet by Bloomberg journalist Mark Gurman, may have been in effect for several months.

By default, OpenAI archives all user interactions with ChatGPT, which is used to train its AI systems. OpenAI's moderators can review the retained conversations to ensure the company's terms of service are not breached.

But, OpenAI has faced recent issues with data breaches, most notably a bug in March that exposed user payment information and initial conversation messages. The event led to Italy introducing a temporary ban on ChatGPT.

In response to these privacy concerns, OpenAI introduced a feature in April that allows users to deactivate chat history. This prevents the chat data from being used to train the AI model. However, even with this feature active, OpenAI keeps the chat data for 30 days, allowing it to monitor it for inappropriate usage before permanently erasing it.

Given that ChatGPT can be used to enhance coding efficiency and facilitate idea generation, it is conceivable that Apple is apprehensive about its employees potentially inputting sensitive project details into the system. OpenAI's moderators could potentially access such data. A data breach or leak could also spill confidential information online.

This move by Apple follows a similar action taken by Samsung last month after an accidental leak of sensitive information. Other large corporations, including JPMorgan, Amazon, Bank of America, and Citigroup, have also prohibited using ChatGPT to safeguard company data.

About the Author

Keira is an experienced cybersecurity and tech writer dedicated to providing comprehensive insights on VPNs, online privacy, and internet censorship.