We review vendors based on rigorous testing and research but also take into account your feedback and our affiliate commission with providers. Some providers are owned by our parent company.
Learn more
vpnMentor was established in 2014 as an independent site reviewing VPN services and covering privacy-related stories. Today, our team of hundreds of cybersecurity researchers, writers, and editors continues to help readers fight for their online freedom in partnership with Kape Technologies PLC, which also owns the following products: ExpressVPN, CyberGhost, and Private Internet Access which may be ranked and reviewed on this website. The reviews published on vpnMentor are believed to be accurate as of the date of each article, and written according to our strict reviewing standards that prioritize the independent, professional and honest examination of the reviewer, taking into account the technical capabilities and qualities of the product together with its commercial value for users. The rankings and reviews we publish may also take into consideration the common ownership mentioned above, and affiliate commissions we earn for purchases through links on our website. We do not review all VPN providers and information is believed to be accurate as of the date of each article.
Advertising Disclosure

vpnMentor was established in 2014 as an independent site reviewing VPN services and covering privacy-related stories. Today, our team of hundreds of cybersecurity researchers, writers, and editors continues to help readers fight for their online freedom in partnership with Kape Technologies PLC, which also owns the following products: ExpressVPN, CyberGhost, and Private Internet Access which may be ranked and reviewed on this website. The reviews published on vpnMentor are believed to be accurate as of the date of each article, and written according to our strict reviewing standards that prioritize the independent, professional and honest examination of the reviewer, taking into account the technical capabilities and qualities of the product together with its commercial value for users. The rankings and reviews we publish may also take into consideration the common ownership mentioned above, and affiliate commissions we earn for purchases through links on our website. We do not review all VPN providers and information is believed to be accurate as of the date of each article.

Procter and Gamble Disclose Data Breach

Procter and Gamble Disclose Data Breach
Zane Kennedy Published on 4th April 2023 Cybersecurity Researcher

Procter & Gamble (P&G) is the latest of many companies to disclose that they were affected by a vulnerability in Fortra’s GoAnywhere file-sharing solution. This resulted in a breach in early February that exposed the personal information of an unknown number of its employees.

In a statement given to BleepingComputer, "P&G can confirm that it was one of the many companies affected by Fortra's GoAnywhere incident. As part of this incident, an unauthorized third party obtained some information about P&G employees."

P&G has confirmed that the attackers did not gain access to employees' financial or social security information, but they did manage to steal some of their other personal data.

"When we learned of this incident in early February, we promptly investigated the nature and scope of the issue, disabled [the] use of the vendor's services, and notified employees," P&G said.

P&G also reassured customers that there was no indication that any customer data was affected by the issues and that "business operations are continuing as normal."

The company did not disclose exactly what information was stolen or the identity of those responsible for the security breach. However, this incident is linked to a series of extortion demands from the Clop ransomware gang, who claimed responsibility for exploiting the relevant zero-day vulnerability in the GoAnywhere tool. They have been publicly extorting affected companies since March 10th.

The vulnerability allowed the attackers to achieve remote code execution on unpatched GoAnywhere MFT systems that had their administrative console exposed to the internet. Clop exploited the CVE-2023-0669 GoAnywhere vulnerability and stole data of more than 130 organizations, or so they claim.

In ransom notes sent to victims, the ransomware gang identifies themselves as the "Clop hacker group" and warns that they have stolen sensitive documents. The group threatens to publish the information on Clop's leak site and sell it on the black market if the victims refuse to negotiate.

Clop has been active since 2019 and reportedly amassed around $500 million in extortion payouts by November 2021. Although the group halted its activities for a time due to multiple arrests, it has since re-emerged.

So far, the list of victims who have acknowledged GoAnywhere breaches and have been extorted by Clop include Community Health Systems (CHS), Hatch Bank, and Rubrik.

About the Author

Zane is a Cybersecurity Researcher and Writer at vpnMentor. His extensive experience in the tech and cybersecurity industries provides readers with accurate and trustworthy news stories and articles. He aims to help individuals protect themselves through informative content and awareness of cybersecurity's crucial role in today's digital landscape.