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vpnMentor was established in 2014 to review VPN services and cover privacy-related stories. Today, our team of hundreds of cybersecurity researchers, writers, and editors continues to help readers fight for their online freedom in partnership with Kape Technologies PLC, which also owns the following products: ExpressVPN, CyberGhost, and Private Internet Access which may be ranked and reviewed on this website. The reviews published on vpnMentor are believed to be accurate as of the date of each article, and written according to our strict reviewing standards that prioritize professional and honest examination of the reviewer, taking into account the technical capabilities and qualities of the product together with its commercial value for users. The rankings and reviews we publish may also take into consideration the common ownership mentioned above, and affiliate commissions we earn for purchases through links on our website. We do not review all VPN providers and information is believed to be accurate as of the date of each article.
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vpnMentor was established in 2014 to review VPN services and cover privacy-related stories. Today, our team of hundreds of cybersecurity researchers, writers, and editors continues to help readers fight for their online freedom in partnership with Kape Technologies PLC, which also owns the following products: ExpressVPN, CyberGhost, and Private Internet Access which may be ranked and reviewed on this website. The reviews published on vpnMentor are believed to be accurate as of the date of each article, and written according to our strict reviewing standards that prioritize professional and honest examination of the reviewer, taking into account the technical capabilities and qualities of the product together with its commercial value for users. The rankings and reviews we publish may also take into consideration the common ownership mentioned above, and affiliate commissions we earn for purchases through links on our website. We do not review all VPN providers and information is believed to be accurate as of the date of each article.

Avast SecureLine VPN Review 2024: Is It Safe & Trustworthy?

Our Score: 6.6/10
Ranked 43rd out of 293 VPNs
Matthew Amos Updated on 23rd April 2024 Fact-checked by Anneke van Aswegen Senior Editor

Avast sells some of the most popular antivirus software, and Avast SecureLine is its own VPN. Unfortunately, many people have found this VPN on their computers and have no idea why. The company has had a controversial history, so is this a VPN you should try, or should you uninstall it immediately?

Avast SecureLine VPN might be worth testing, but better options exist. While it’s good in a few areas, it’s not worth what you get for the price. In this article, I’ll tell you how to delete it, cancel it, or get its 2-month free trial. However, if you want to find one of the best VPNs, check out this list of our highest-ranked providers.

Short on Time? Here Are My Key Findings

Pros

Cons

Avast SecureLine VPN Features — 2024 Update

6.8
💸 Price 4.39 USD/month
📆 Money Back Guarantee 30 Days
📝 Does VPN keep logs? No
🖥 Number of servers 700+
💻 Number of devices per license 10
🛡 Kill switch Yes
🗺 Based in country Czech Republic
🛠 Support 24/7 live chat
📥 Supports torrenting Yes

Streaming — Slightly Above Average

7.2

My global team and I could safely stream most of our local platforms while connected to Avast SecureLine VPN. The quality was generally good, but we did run into a few issues.

While you could theoretically use a VPN like Avast SecureLine to view content unavailable in your region, it’s important to note that this will likely cause a copyright violation. My teammates and I only connected to servers in our respective countries during testing.

Important. The vpnMentor team and I are firmly against copyright infringements. Avast SecureLine VPN claims to never view any of your online activities. This means it’s up to you to use it responsibly. We urge you to use it lawfully and to never break the T&Cs of any streaming platform you use.

Works With: Netflix, Max, Disney+, and Amazon Prime Video

During my tests from the US, I could securely watch Netflix while connected to its Gotham City (streaming) server. There are also streaming-optimized locations in Germany and the UK.

Screenshot of Netflix player streaming 3 Body Problem while connected to Avast SecureLine VPN's US streaming server There were no instances of buffering or dips in quality

My teammates in Canada, Brazil, and the UK could also securely stream Netflix. We were impressed that Avast SecureLine let us securely watch our complete local Netflix libraries.

I was also able to safely stream Max with the Gotham City server. Unfortunately, I was never able to watch Amazon Prime Video from the US. However, my colleague in Australia could stream it with the Melbourne server. On the negative side, it took about 17 seconds for videos to load.

Thankfully, Disney+ could be securely viewed without issues when we used servers in our respective countries.

Screenshot of Disney+ player streaming Death on the Nile while connected to Avast SecureLine VPN's Wonderland, UK serverI could also load videos instantly with the US servers

We had the best results using the streaming-optimized servers with this platform, but my teammates and I never had any issues safely streaming YouTube with regular servers.

Doesn’t Work With: Hulu, BBC iPlayer, and ITVX

Most streaming platforms use anti-VPN technologies to keep anyone from watching in unapproved regions. Even though we were in licensed countries using local servers, these platforms still couldn’t be watched while connected to Avast SecureLine.

Screenshot of Hulu login page showing an error message while connected to Avast SecureLine VPN's Gotham City server Switching protocols and browsers didn't do anything to help

The same thing happened to my colleague from the UK when she tried watching ITVX and BBC iPlayer. She was in London using the streaming-optimized server from the UK, but she could never securely view BBC iPlayer while connected to Avast SecureLine.

Speed — Okay, but Some Servers Are Too Slow

6.6

This VPN is extremely fast on closeby servers, but it slows down a lot at greater distances. So, you could run into trouble if it doesn’t offer many locations near you, and that’s quite likely with its small server network.

To be clear, I connected to various Avast SecureLine VPN servers from around the world, but this was done purely to assess their speeds. As stated above, my team and I are strongly against any form of copyright infringement.

As for the tests, I performed several on each server at different times of day to create averages for the chart you see below. This is to make sure the results are fair as speeds vary quite a bit throughout the day.

Screenshot of a chart showing speeds on various Avast SecureLine VPN serversSpeeds rose 5% on nearby servers and fell 56% on distant ones

These tests were done with the Mimic protocol since it was the fastest. They were performed on a Windows device, which also supports the WireGuard and OpenVPN protocols. I was surprised that Avast’s proprietary Mimic protocol was nearly 30% faster than these more established options. This is good news for Mac users who only get Mimic and IPsec.

Screenshot Ookla speed tests done while connected to Avast SecureLine VPN and with no VPN connection With servers under 3,000 km away, I always got great speeds

The top VPNs will only drop your speeds by about 10-20% on nearby locations. So, Avast’s performance on closeby servers is one of the best I’ve ever seen. On the other hand, its long-distance results were poor; many locations dropped my speed by over 50%. This rarely happens with the fastest VPNs.

Unfortunately, there’s no way to see how crowded its servers are, which could have made it easier to optimize our speeds. These results are a mixed bag, and many VPNs with a comparable price are faster overall. You can check out our list of the fastest VPNs to find a service that’s more consistent and probably offers more servers near you.

Gaming — Low Lag for Fun Sessions

8.6

The Avast VPN gave us low ping rates, which is optimal for smooth gameplay. Your ping lets you know how long it takes the network to respond to your inputs. You need it to at least be below 85ms if you want your game to rapidly respond to your button presses.

Screenshot of Steam running Counter Strike 2 while connected to Avast SecureLine VPN's South Africa serverThere was no delay while he was running or shooting

With nearby locations, there was no noticeable lag while gaming. We typically had ping rates below 65ms with closeby servers. Distant locations could raise our ping up to 400ms and above. However, that’s actually quite normal. I’ve never found a VPN that lets me play games competitively with distant servers. So, SecureLine is very strong in this category.

Server Network — Small and Missing Some Privacy Assurances

5.0

With only 700 servers in 34 countries, Avast SecureLine’s network is pretty small. But, there are a few things I like about it. You can connect quickly (in around 5 seconds). I also appreciate that it clearly labels optimized servers, so they’re easy to find. There are a few somewhat rare locations, like Turkey and Luxembourg, but the rest are pretty standard.

What I don’t like is how hard it is to learn more about Avast SecureLine’s servers. I couldn’t find much about them on its website, and I had to go back and forth with support staff to get answers. Eventually, I learned it has some virtual locations (but they’re not labeled).

A support agent let me know that it owns most of its servers while renting a few others. Unfortunately, just like the virtual locations, there’s nowhere on its site where you can confirm which servers are which. They’re also not RAM-only, a more privacy-friendly server type that deletes all of its information after each reboot.

Screenshot of Avast Secureline's Windows app highlighting the server list I'm a little disappointed there is no search function though

The lack of city-level servers is also disappointing. Most Avast SecureLine servers only tell you what country your IP will be in, which makes it harder to optimize speeds. There are 6 countries that offer cities.

You get the most servers in the US (16), while Canada, Australia, Spain, the UK, and Germany only have 3 cities or less. Since Avast is pretty slow at long-distances, this could end up compromising your speeds, unless you’re in the US where coverage is good.

Finally, it’s a little disappointing that Avast Secureline doesn’t offer dedicated IPs. Most VPNs offer them for a small extra fee, and they give you an IP address only you use. This is especially helpful if you run a website. Overall, this is one of SecureLine’s weaker areas, and you can find a VPN with a larger server network and more privacy protections in this list.

Security — Safe but Missing Additional Features

6.8

Avast SecureLine VPN successfully hides your real location, but it doesn’t have the extra security features many of its competitors offer. It comes with the industry standard AES 256-bit encryption level. This is the same level used by militaries, and it’s nearly impossible to crack.

Screenshot of a leak test performed on ipleak.net while connected to Avast SecureLine VPN's Amsterdam server There were never any leaks during tests on a dozen servers

It prevents DNS, IPv4, and WebRTC leaks (but only with its browser extensions). But, it doesn’t support IPv6 connections yet, putting it behind more popular VPNs. I would also like to see it add some additional features like Double VPN. I do like that it offers OpenVPN, WireGuard, and Mimic, but these protocols aren’t available with every app (more on that later).

Mimic is its obfuscation technology, which makes it look like you’re not using a VPN. It’s helpful on restricted networks, like schools and work. OpenVPN is generally considered the safest protocol, and WireGuard is usually the safest, but Mimic actually outperformed it in our speed tests.

Kill Switch

This is an essential feature that blocks your internet connection if the VPN ever disconnects. I like that Avast’s app indicates it’s blocking your network when you switch servers. This reassured me it was working as advertised.

Smart VPN Mode

This lets you program Avast SecureLine to turn on automatically under certain conditions. For example, if you connect to a public network, or open a torrenting app. Overall, there are 4 separate Smart Rules in total.

There’s nothing wrong with this feature, but it would be even more useful if split tunneling came with every app (it’s only available on mobile devices for now). That lets you directly decide what traffic is funneled through the VPN tunnel.

Privacy — Decent Policy With a Bad History

5.6

Even though the VPN’s privacy policy is solid, I understand if Avast’s history puts you off. Avast used to run a company called Jumpshot which sold user data collected through its antivirus browser extensions. On the one hand, you could choose not to share data with the company. But it was an option many users missed.

Most people probably believed Avast only needed anonymized data to keep its services running and didn’t realize their browsing history would be sold. While Avast shut down Jumpshot in 2020 after this was revealed, it still left a bad impression.

Many people have also complained about Avast SecureLine VPN showing up on their computer out of nowhere. Often, this happened because people had gotten Avast Antivirus in the past and allowed the program to make automatic updates (which they didn’t expect to include a VPN). When an entirely new app mysteriously appears on your computer, I can understand why it’s upsetting.

Others claim that the VPN arrived on their computer because they had another free anti malware program like CCleaner installed on their device. Avast has purchased many smaller free companies, so it’s possible the VPN was added to their computer, even though they didn’t know they had Avast products.

I can’t say exactly why Avast SecureLine VPN has been added to anyone’s device because it hasn’t happened to me. Unfortunately, I was never given satisfactory answers over live chat when I asked about these controversies. Once, I was even told a representative from the company would get back to me over email, but it never happened.

If any of these issues bother you, I completely understand why you wouldn’t want to use Avast products anymore. To get a VPN that doesn't collect data with a proven privacy policy, check out our list of the best no-log VPNs.

Does Avast SecureLine VPN Keep Logs? No

On the bright side, you’re protected by a good no-logs policy if you only use the VPN. That means I’m not concerned about my privacy while I use Avast SecureLine VPN. However, I’d still be a little worried about using Avast Antivirus. When you sign up for that software, or its other security bundles, you’re asked for more information (including your name and billing address).

What it does record is timestamps, the amount of data transferred, if you uninstall or use auto-connections, and how many times you’ve connected. It also records the data you send them, but you can stay more private by signing up with a throwaway email address.

There are VPNs that record less data, but it doesn’t store any information that can be traced back to you. Avast SecureLine stores everything for 2 years.

Was Avast SecureLine VPN Audited? No

Unfortunately, there have been no independent audits of Avast’s apps or privacy policy. That’s too bad because it could clean up its reputation by undergoing a few audits. I hope it decides to work with some of the top auditing companies in the future to prove it sticks to its claims.

It does issue tri-monthly Warrant Canaries, which let you know if anyone has requested its information. But, it has missed a few, which doesn’t help its case.

Based in the Czech Republic

Thankfully, Avast isn’t located in a country within the 5/9/14 Eyes Alliances. This is an agreement between governments to share their citizens’ information. That means a VPN company in one of those countries could be asked to change its policies in the future. With Avast SecureLine VPN, that’s not something you need to worry about.

Does Avast SecureLine VPN Work in China? No

Customer support told me that you can’t use Avast SecureLine VPN in China.

Screenshot of a conversation with Avast SecureLine VPN's live chat where they state it does not work in China Most VPNs don't work in the region, so this isn't uncommon

The Chinese government has banned many VPNs, but there haven’t been any publicly-reported cases of them going after individuals for using them. My team and I don’t condone any illegal activities, so we advise you to read up on the laws before deciding to use a VPN. If you choose to use a VPN in the country, you can read about these VPNS proven to work in China.

Torrenting — Good for P2P File-Sharing

8.2

Avast Secureline offers excellent speeds for torrenting. It only has 8 optimized servers, but I actually didn’t have issues torrenting with any of its locations.

During my tests, I could complete a 700MB file in about 19 minutes with no VPN connected. Using the P2P server in Miami, I could finish the same file in only 10 minutes. Optimized servers are definitely the fastest as the normal servers didn’t let me finish the file any faster.

Avast SecureLine also offers solid security and doesn’t log any identifiable information. So, if you still trust the company after its shaky history, it’s a solid choice for torrenting. While it’s legal to torrent in most countries, downloading copyrighted files is always illegal. I recommend you only download material in the public domain when you use P2P services.

Installation & Apps

6.6

Installation & Apps — Good Apps but Only for A Few Devices

Avast SecureLine is easy to install and navigate.

Screenshot of Avast SecureLine VPN's Windows app highlighting the settings menu The settings let you switch protocols and make adjustments

Everything is basically the same on mobile apps. The main difference is there’s just a settings button rather than a menu. It also doesn’t have tabs for its streaming and torrenting servers, but they’re clearly labeled.

Setup & Installation

It only took a few minutes to install Avast SecureLine on each device I tested. On Windows or Mac, you’ll download it from the website. On iOS or Android devices, you’ll do it through your phone’s app store.

Screenshot of Avast SecureLine VPN's download page The installation apps were all free of malware and viruses

As I mentioned above, some people have had issues with Avast SecureLine showing up on their device when they didn’t expect it. Thankfully, it’s just as easy to uninstall. It’s no different than removing other programs from your device.

Quick Guide: How to Uninstall Avast SecureLine VPN in 3 Steps

  1. Find “Avast SecureLine VPN” in your program list. This is different depending on your device. It’s easiest to search for the term “uninstall.”
  2. Uninstall the VPN. Now, you’ll be able to remove it. You can also uninstall any other Avast products on your device if you’re worried an automatic update will install it again.
  3. Cancel if you’re subscribed. This is easy to forget when you no longer have the app.

Device Compatibility

Avast SecureLine VPN is only available for the most popular operating systems. There are apps for Windows, Mac, iOS, and Android devices, but nothing else. There’s no way to set it up on a router. There’s also no smart DNS feature, so you can’t use it on a gaming console or most smart TVs (except for Android TVs of course). Plus, there’s no Linux app.

To use a VPN on all your tech, check out our list of VPNs that work with way more devices.

Desktop — Apps for Windows and Mac

The apps are nearly identical, except Windows has superior protocols. You can use WireGuard, OpenVPN, and Mimic with the Windows app. The Mac version only gives you access to Mimic and IPsec.

Android and iPhone (iOS)

The mobile apps both come with split tunneling and all the protocols you get with the Windows app. They don’t have access to the Smart VPN feature, but split tunneling actually lets you use all those features with even more control.

Browser Extensions for Chrome and Firefox

These are actually remote controls for the VPN. What’s good about that is they truly protect your entire device. Many browser extensions only connect you to proxies, and these only change the IP address on your browser. These are actually safer overall than only using the VPN app because they also add WebRTC leak protection.

Simultaneous Device Connections

You can use Avast SecureLineVPN on 10 devices at once, which is more than most VPNs offer. There are a few that come with unlimited connections, but this is plenty for me. I set it up on my Windows laptop, 2 Android phones, and a tablet. I could watch social media videos on all of them at once without any performance issues, so it works as advertised.

Pricing

6.4
3-years subscription
$ 4.39 / month per month
2-years subscription
$ 4.39 / month per month
1-year subscription
$ 4.59 / month per month

Pricing — Long Trial but Plans Aren’t That Cheap

While I appreciate its 60-day trial, Avast SecureLine is pretty expensive for what it offers. It only has long-term plans (the shortest term is 1 year), which might make it seem more affordable at first. However, CyberGhost and PIA are far superior, and they have long-term plans that are half the price.

I don’t recommend buying it through your phone. It does offer shorter plans on mobile devices, but you only get a 7-day trial, and the worst part is you can only use Avast SecureLine on that one device.

You do need to enter payment info to get the 60-day trial. With that said, you won’t be charged until the period is over. It lets you pay with Visa, Amex, Discover, MasterCard, and PayPal. There’s also a 30-day money-back guarantee, which I found to be reliable after testing it out.

Screenshot of a live chat conversation with Avast SecureLine VPN's support staff where I was approved for a refund I had to go back and forth with them for a while first though

Many people seem to have issues canceling their subscriptions. The simplest way is to just contact support. Unfortunately, that’s not super easy with Avast, so check out this guide:

Quick Guide: How to Cancel Avast SecureLine VPN in 3 Steps

  1. Click Contact Us on Avast’s webpage. You can find this near the bottom of Avast’s website. Then, you’ll be asked what product you’re using. Choose Avast SecureLine VPN.
  2. Answer the questions to reach support. Choose technical support for a paid Avast product, then choose the chat option. Next, you’ll have to enter your information including the order number, which you can find in your confirmation email.
  3. Ask for your cancelation. Now just click Start Chat, and you can tell a support agent to end your subscription.

Reliability & Support

5.0

Reliability and Support — Difficult to Reach With Poor Answers

It’s nice that there’s a 24/7 live chat, but it takes some work to access. I’m also disappointed that the chat is only offered for paying customers —I like to ask a few questions before I make my purchases. The staff I interacted with also didn’t seem very knowledgeable.

Screenshot of a conversation with Avast SecureLine VPN's live chat where they couldn't tell me if the VPN had been auditedI was surprised that the agent hadn't heard of VPN audits

That’s not to mention the problems I faced when asking about the company’s controversies. Overall, the staff seem more interested in promoting the VPN, than helping. To get high quality support for your service, check out one of these VPNs that provide excellent answers to your questions.

Compare Avast SecureLine VPN With The Top Alternative VPNs
Our Score: 9.9
Our Score: 9.7
Our Score: 9.5
Our Score: 9.4
Editors' Note: Intego, Private Internet Access, Cyberghost and Expressvpn are owned by Kape Technologies, our parent company.

The Bottom Line

Final Verdict — Worth a Try if You’re Comfortable With Its History

Avast SecureLine has some strong points and offers one of the longest trial periods around. It’s an attractive app with great speeds on nearby servers. This provides excellent performance for gaming and torrenting that you can test for 60 days.

On the other hand, it doesn’t offer enough for how much it costs. The server network is small, it’s missing many useful security features, and its privacy policies have never been through an independent audit (which you’d expect after its past issues). To get a VPN that’s worth your money, I recommend you check out this list of our top VPNs.

  • Decent security features
  • Great for gaming
  • Fast torrenting
  • 60-day free trial period

FAQs on Avast SecureLine

What is Avast SecureLine VPN?

Avast SecureLine is a VPN offered by Avast (a company famous for its antivirus program). You can get it in a bundle with all of Avast’s security programs, or on its own. A VPN lets you connect to encrypted servers that hide your real location, making it look like you’re somewhere else. It comes with an extensive free trial that lets you test out its features if you give Avast your payment information.

Why is Avast SecureLine VPN on my computer?

It’s most likely there if you’ve installed other Avast products and allowed automatic updates. This can be confusing because Avast has purchased many smaller anti-malware programs, like CCleaner. So, you might not have been aware you had an Avast program on your device. Luckily, it doesn’t come with any malware, and it’s easy to uninstall.

Is Avast SecureLine VPN free?

No, but there is a 60-day free trial. To get this, you do have to give the company your credit card information. If you don’t cancel before the period is up, you’ll be charged for a yearly subscription (at the least). This lets you test it out for a long time risk-free, but there’s no official free app.

Money Back Guarantee (Days): 30
Mobile app:
Number of devices per license: 10
We review vendors based on rigorous testing and research but also take into account your feedback and our affiliate commission with providers. Some providers are owned by our parent company.
Learn more
vpnMentor was established in 2014 to review VPN services and cover privacy-related stories. Today, our team of hundreds of cybersecurity researchers, writers, and editors continues to help readers fight for their online freedom in partnership with Kape Technologies PLC, which also owns the following products: ExpressVPN, CyberGhost, and Private Internet Access which may be ranked and reviewed on this website. The reviews published on vpnMentor are believed to be accurate as of the date of each article, and written according to our strict reviewing standards that prioritize professional and honest examination of the reviewer, taking into account the technical capabilities and qualities of the product together with its commercial value for users. The rankings and reviews we publish may also take into consideration the common ownership mentioned above, and affiliate commissions we earn for purchases through links on our website. We do not review all VPN providers and information is believed to be accurate as of the date of each article.
Avast SecureLine VPN User Reviews (User reviews are not verified)
5.1
Based on 44 reviews in 14 languages

Write a Review on Avast SecureLine VPN

Please rate VPN.

All Speed Streaming Security Сustomer service
Simon Dhaese
Simon Dhaese
6/10
Not bad. But not great either

I unblocked Tubi TV, from cellphone in England. But not on Chromecast. Can sometimes buffer a lot, but only sometimes. Has trouble keeping connected on WiFi. But stays connected with cellular data. Used better VPN before.

Anonymous
Anonymous
2/10
Not for Streaming

SecureLine VPN is detected by multiple streaming services, examples are below. Netflix: Certain shows are hidden despite VPN and Non-VPN locations being the same. HBO Max: "Not in Service Area or VPN Detected" Hulu: "It looks like you're using an anonymous proxy or VPN" Amazon Prime: "Your device is connected to the Internet using a VPN or proxy service. Please disable it and try again. For more help, go to amazon.com/pv-vpn."

Tracy Lu
Tracy Lu
10/10
Good VPN and trustworthy company

Avast VPN is a good VPN for basic users. It is surprisingly robust. The company is trustworthy because it is a household name in the antivirus industry. The only thing I did not like was the pricing and lack of features. This is easy-to-use though

About the Author

Matthew is a writer and editor for VPNMentor with a proven track record of providing in-depth analysis of the most highly regarded VPNs, including ExpressVPN and CyberGhost. His unparalleled expertise has enabled him to consistently deliver cutting-edge insights on the most sought-after (and newest) VPN services.

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